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JetCo Federal President Elected to Women Impacting Public Policy Board of Directors

Grand Rapids, MICH (Oct 27, 2021) — Sue (Schweim) Tellier, Owner and President of Grand Rapids-based JetCo Federal, a supply chain management and logistics company, was recently elected as the new Leadership Advisory Council Vice Chair and a Member of the Board for Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP).

WIPP is a national nonpartisan organization advocating on behalf of women entrepreneurs—strengthening their impact on our nation’s public policy, creating economic opportunities, and forging alliances with other business organizations.

(Schweim) Tellier will assume her positions on WIPP’s board starting January 1 of 2022 and will work with fellow board members to execute and deliver strategic objectives for the organization.

“WIPP is widely respected for their advocacy on behalf of women-owned small businesses, and their knowledge of programs that support women entrepreneurs,” said (Schweim) Tellier. “The business owners and leaders I have met through WIPP are already lifelong friends – they are women who generously share their time and talent. I’m honored to serve with them, and I’m excited to further WIPP’s mission.”

Kathie Fuce-Hobohm of Space, Inc. (also a Michigan business owner), Pamela O’Rourke of Icon Information Consultants, LaJuanna Russell of Business Management Associates, and Andrea Tsakanikas of CrewFacilities.com join (Schweim) Tellier as newly elected WIPP board members.

For more information about Women Impacting Public Policy, please visit www.wipp.org/.

Courtney Fairchild from Global Services

Woman-Owned Business Spotlight: Global Services

In this edition of our woman-owned small business spotlight series, we feature Global Services, headed by President and CEO, Courtney Fairchild. In 23 years within the arena of federal proposals and GSA Schedules, Global Services has empowered clients with over 3,000 contract awards valuing more than 20 billion dollars.

Global Services Logo

Author’s note: Global Services doesn’t just empower clients – they generously share knowledge that builds stronger compliance systems, which enable scale for sales. Also, they’re fun.

Courtney Fairchild shares her story with us:

Can you give us some background on your start with Global Services?

I have been with Global Services since our inception, and I was fortunate enough to be able to purchase the company seventeen years ago. Since the beginning, I worked in and developed every aspect of our business allowing it to morph along the way guided by client demand. For me, the only logical step was to make it my own!

What is your proudest moment for the company?

My proudest moment for our company was crossing the $1,000,000 revenue threshold in our early years. I remembered a statistic in American Express Small Business Reports that less than 3% of Women-Owned Businesses had revenue in excess of $1,000,000 and I was thrilled to be a part of this elite group.

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome with Global Services?

Over seven years ago, just as I had poised Global Services to truly grow, it became clear to me that my business partner was not interested in taking this journey or risk any further.  Believing in myself, and what I had created over time, I decided to purchase the other half of our company. Since that time, I have been able to lead Global Services to over 66% revenue growth.

What advice would you give to other women entrepreneurs?

Embrace your fear. A lot of people think entrepreneurship is about not being afraid, but the truth is that it is more about acknowledging the fear. As you take risks, it is essential that you recognize, analyze, and experience your fear in order to be able to push past it.

Do you have any suggestions on resources that women-owned small businesses should use?

Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) is a strong resource for all WOSBs who want to grow their businesses. WIPP is a national nonpartisan organization advocating on behalf of women entrepreneurs—strengthening their impact on our nation’s public policy, creating economic opportunities, and forging alliances with other business organizations. I am honored to serve on the WIPP Board of Directors.

Another author’s note: Courtney is a badass WOSB advocate. She demonstrates support of women entrepreneurs routinely – with her actions and her guidance. I met Courtney through WIPP. She was welcoming, and she’s encouraged me to increase my involvement with the organization.

To learn more about Global Services, please visit https://www.globalservicesinc.com/.

Carrie Jokiel of ChemTrack

Woman-Owned Small Business Spotlight: ChemTrack

Welcome to the second edition of our woman-owned small business spotlight series. This edition highlights ChemTrack, an environmental engineering, remediation services, and construction company. The company’s President, Carrie Jokiel, shares her story and advice for other woman-owned small businesses.

Can you provide a brief overview of what ChemTrack does?

ChemTrack is an 8(a) Alaskan Woman-Owned Small Business, specializing in environmental engineering, remediation services, and construction. We combine geological, chemical, hydrological, and engineering expertise with a broad understanding of regulatory and risk frameworks to solve environmental assessment and regulatory compliance problems for our clients. ChemTrack tailors innovative methods and concepts to individual problems and provides environmental solutions, especially as they apply to arctic and subarctic conditions in Alaska.

What inspired you to start ChemTrack?

I’m a born and raised Alaskan woman and second-generation “ChemTrackian.” My mother grew up in bush Alaska, our remote areas, as my grandparents were teachers in the villages. My dad emigrated here from Germany to attend the University of Alaska Fairbanks back in the ‘60s. He fell in love with my mom and the spirit of Alaska. Being raised with that same spirit led me to becoming partners with my father and eventually becoming majority owner. We both share the entrepreneurial spirit that comes from the beauty and opportunities this great State has to offer.

That combination of respect and entrepreneurship has created a workforce culture that truly enjoys what we do to prevent negative environmental impacts, restore our remote areas to their original pristine conditions, and work together with our clients that share our passion for the State of Alaska.

What is your proudest moment for ChemTrack?

This summer season is already kicking off to be my proudest moment. I feel like we have arrived.  We have worked incredibly hard to be prepared to have a good season and I see the fruit of that labor happening. We were coming off a tough, stressful season last year, and the resilience my team has shown along with the can-do spirit, has been incredible to witness.

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome with ChemTrack?

We had a project go sideways two seasons ago that had a ripple effect into last year’s season as well.  It stressed our company at every level; it pulled my focus away from our strategic plan into survival mode; it affected the crew involved on the project, from the project manager to each laborer.  Amazingly, it also bonded us together. We were all in the trenches together, backs against a wall, and we survived. I wouldn’t wish tough days on any business owner, but the grit my crew showed and what we learned from our challenge has made us a much better company and now, we are poised to thrive.

What advice would you give to other women entrepreneurs?

Listen to the nudges you feel when leading. Realize you are a master of your trade and how you lead may seem unique to the mainstream we are often surrounded by. Know that your intuitiveness matters, and is at its core, how YOU run your company. Basically, you know what you’re doing – keep crushin’ it.

Do you have any suggestions on resources that women-owned small businesses should use?

To keep up on what our government is doing to help women-owned small businesses, get involved in Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP).  If starting out, get to know your PTAC office.  If a federal contractor, get to know your local SBA office personnel.  If you’re a federal contractor and can budget it, use a service like FEDMINE to track and monitor RFPs, competitors, and contracts. Good luck!

To learn more about ChemTrack, visit their website at http://chemtrack.net/.

4 Certification Programs for Women-Owned Small Businesses

In one of our most recent blog posts, we highlighted some of the ways to better market your company as a women-owned small business. One of these ways was to know the women-owned small business (WOSB) program inside and out and to look into becoming WOSB certified.

What does it mean to be WOSB certified?

In order to be eligible for the WOSB Contracting Program, in which you compete for federal contracts that are set aside for your diverse status, you need to be a certified WOSB – either through self-certification or through third-party certification. This lets the government verify that you are what you say you are: a women-owned small business. Here are four different certification programs for you to choose from seeking third-party certification.

Certification Programs

1. The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council

Also known as WBENC, the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council is the largest certifier of women-owned businesses in the U.S. Becoming WOSB-certified through WBENC has a variety of benefits, including opportunities to network and pursue business deals, scholarship and award opportunities, and a variety of ways to promote your business. View all the benefits here.

2. The National Women Business Owners Corporation

Also known as NWBOC, the National Women Business Owners Corporation became the first organization to create a national certification program for women-owned businesses more than 20 years ago. The benefits of becoming WOSB-certified through NWBOC include a mentoring program, trainings and webinars, and award opportunities. View all the benefits here.

3. The U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce

Also known as USWCC, the U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce helps women start and build successful businesses and careers. The organization is an authorized 3rd party certifier for the federal WOSB and EDWOSB programs. The benefits of becoming WOSB-certified through USWCC include access to conferences and summits throughout the year.

4. The El Paso Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Also known as EPHCC, the El Paso Hispanic Chamber of Commerce offers several Federal small business certifications for any business that would like to become a supplier for the U.S. Government. Business development specialists assess your business and help you with the certification process.

Interested in self-certification? No worries. Check out this preparation checklist from the Small Business Administration to kick-start your self-certification process.

Becoming certified as a WOSB can help you stand out among your competition and can result in federal contracts set aside for your diverse status. Take it from us – JetCo Federal is a WBENC certified company. Though the certification program may require some paperwork, it pays off in the long run by helping further differentiate your company. By using one of these four third-party certification programs, you’ll be on your way better marketing your company as a WOSB.